Projects & Grants

Internal Grant Competition DGC





Changes in bowel habit after sleeve gastrectomy
Project IdSGS06/LF/2018
Main solverdoc. MUDr. Peter Ihnát, Ph.D., MBA
Periodr1/2018 - 12/2018
ProviderSpecifický VŠ výzkum
Statefinished
AnotationObesity presents very serious medical and social issue due to continual worldwide increase in obesity prevalence. Overweight and obesity are significant risk factors in pathogenesis of many diseases including evacuation disorders (incontinence and obstipation). Bariatric surgery is the only effective modality in the treatment of morbid obesity with sustained weight loss and positive effect on associated comorbidities. Bariatric surgery has a significant impact on dietary intake, weight loss, patient?s metabolism and also on defecation stereotypes. However, data regarding the impact of bariatric surgery on evacuation disorders are very limited in the available literature. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate changes in prevalence and seriousness of defecation disorders in morbidly obese patients after sleeve gastrectomy. Within the last decade, sleeve gastrectomy became the most commonly performed type of bariatric surgery worldwide. Proposed clinical study is planned for one year beginning 1.1.2018. All patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy in University Hospital Ostrava during the last 5 years will be enrolled in the study. Defecation disorders will be assessed by means of standardized scoring systems - Wexner Constipation Score a Fecal Incontinence Severity Score. Postgraduate students (Department of Surgical studies, Medical Faculty, University of Ostrava) will participate on study survey (data collection), data analysis and interpretation. Students will also be involved in the preparation of study publication outcomes (original articles). Study proposer is convinced that proposed study fulfills all aspects of high-quality student scientific project which is in accordance with declared priorities of scientific objectives of Medical Faculty (Obesity as a worldwide problem).